BMI Redefined™ with Gin and Moe

S4 E1 What Are Your Hidden Super Powers?

September 21, 2022 Gin and Moe Season 4 Episode 1
BMI Redefined™ with Gin and Moe
S4 E1 What Are Your Hidden Super Powers?
Show Notes Transcript

We all have them... the hidden super powers that can help us achieve our goals and design our plan to reach our dreams.  Moe and Gin share a vibrant discussion about how to identify and utilize your hidden super powers to go after your dreams :)

Speaker 1:

This is BMI Redefined with Gin and Mo . All right . Hey everybody. Welcome back to BMI Redefined with Jen and Mo . Yay . It is a beautiful day in St . Louis, Missouri.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah. Okay. So what are we gonna talk about today?

Speaker 2:

Well, I happen to have just heard an amazing quote.

Speaker 1:

Mm-hmm. <affirmative> and what is

Speaker 2:

It? Ralph Waldo Emerson said, The hardest thing to do is to be your self in a world which is constantly trying to change you.

Speaker 1:

Hmm . That is very true.

Speaker 2:

It is true. It is. There's always people trying to change you, judge you all that

Speaker 1:

Trying to tell you how you should do you.

Speaker 2:

Right. And who knows better how to do you than you

Speaker 1:

<laugh> . I know . Exactly.

Speaker 2:

Really seriously.

Speaker 1:

Right. So , so poo poo on those people <laugh> . So

Speaker 2:

Anyway, so what we were talking about the other day though, was diving into a discussion about hidden superpowers.

Speaker 1:

Right. Woo . And we got this idea because we were looking at a magazine called Psychology Today. Yes. And there are some things in there that we didn't really agree with mm-hmm. <affirmative>, but there were many things we did agree with. Right. And we'll be touching upon both of those. Yeah. There are 10 hidden super powers. Mm-hmm. <affirmative> that we are going to go through.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And the researchers that will be quoting along the way that wrote some pretty powerful, super powerful, It's

Speaker 1:

Pretty cool articles. Yeah. Super powerful. Yeah . And it's kinda like, you know, what is your superpower? If you could have a superpower, what would your superpower

Speaker 2:

Be like in reality? Or like, if I could be like , um, Marvel or DC Comics or something . Yes. That's always wanted to fly

Speaker 1:

<laugh> fly. Okay . Okay. Cool. Cool.

Speaker 2:

What about you?

Speaker 1:

I don't know. I think mine would be to become invisible <laugh> because then it could go anywhere and do anything people wouldn't know.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah. Well, or the shape Shapeshifters.

Speaker 1:

The Shapeshifters,

Speaker 2:

Yeah . Morphing, right ? Yeah . Yeah . That'd be pretty super cool too. Yeah .

Speaker 1:

Yeah . That would be pretty cool. So anyway, I don't know , but that's not gonna happen. No . But at least we can, you know, think that <laugh> , so there

Speaker 2:

You go. Well, you know, another something that I've been wanting to do in life. I am currently having my house painted. I'm gonna do some painting myself, cuz I've just moved into a new house.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I thought you were going to say get a divorce.

Speaker 2:

Nope . Already did that. Right.

Speaker 1:

<laugh>, congratulations. Five . Thanks.

Speaker 2:

Yeah . Yeah. So I just got a house and we're gonna be having some retreats and some workshops. And what you said Mo, was women could come to these retreats to recharge, reflect, renew, and rebuild their own definition of BMI redefined.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Body, mind image.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Because

Speaker 1:

We all have our own journey and our own redefining of who we are now . I have a friend right now who just found out that she has a father out there through some DNA testing. I have another friend who has decided that she is going to be getting a divorce because it's healthier for her. Mm-hmm. <affirmative> , I mean, you know, you can relate to that. Yeah. Yeah . It's pretty powerful that they're taking their life and recreating something mm-hmm . <affirmative> that will be better for their children and be better for themselves.

Speaker 2:

Exactly. You know, you nailed it. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

It's so cool. It's so cool. Okay, so let's go ahead and get into the , uh, hidden superpower. So the first one is imperfection. And this is the classic superpower, but in real life pretending to have, it tends to backfire <laugh> . So instead, those who make mistakes and let others know it are better liked and often more successful. And that is an article by Marina Harris, PhD , by the way. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>, do you want to comment on that?

Speaker 2:

Well, I mean, it was kind of like those of us who either are or have been perfectionist at some point in our lives, like me before the car wreck, total double type a personality perfectionist to the hilt . And ,

Speaker 1:

And we would not be friends.

Speaker 2:

No. And I you , I don't look like that anymore. I no

Speaker 1:

<laugh>. No,

Speaker 2:

No. Like I've got , I've got dishes in my sink right now, and I have a house that needs to be cleaned and it is not Yeah. Which is fine and bother me really? But I mean, at that point was I happy I was stressed out all the time.

Speaker 1:

Right, right .

Speaker 2:

You know, if everything wasn't exactly in place and perfect, I it caused anxiety and stress and all that. Mm-hmm . <affirmative> and that brought it on myself.

Speaker 1:

Right.

Speaker 2:

Nobody else was making me be a perfectionist. I brought that on myself. And I , and there are people today in this world who bring on perfectionism on themselves. And it really, I think, leads to stress. What is the second super

Speaker 1:

Power number two is generativity. We often imagine that putting others before ourselves is a sign of weakness. But research suggests it's actually a stealth superpower. The most generative people have better long-term wellbeing than others. So, Eric Erickson, who first proposed the theory called opposite of generativity is stagnation. Okay. And in his model, people who stagnate become more and more self, which I do believe, and I , but , but hold on a second. But then he goes, they , uh, this person, the article Susan Cross whi borne PhD says , um, that if that ha people who stagnate become more and more self-focused, spending money on endless home rede expensive vacations and beauty treatments. Do you wanna say something about that?

Speaker 2:

Oh , well, yeah. I'm not spending endless money on redecorating my house, I'm just painting it to start with.

Speaker 1:

Right, Exactly. That's

Speaker 2:

Different. Right .

Speaker 1:

So you have to be able to take care of yourself first before you can help others. But it's the stagnant part that when that is put into the mix, that's where it gets dangerous. Right. But what were you going to

Speaker 2:

Say? You well, the oxygen mask on the airplane, put your own on before you help the other people around you. Exactly. That's the kind of thing that I think Eric Erickson is talking about. Right.

Speaker 1:

And to care for others because, you know, pass it on. Right. The

Speaker 2:

Generativity pay. Yeah. Pay it forward. Pay

Speaker 1:

It forward. Yeah . The , you know , uh, the generation, the next generation. And if you feel like you are contributing, then you're going to be self-fulfilled and you're going to be helping others. And that's, I think, the core of this.

Speaker 2:

Well, it is. And Eric also, Eric Erickson also went into the stages of life, which kind of mirrors Maslow's hierarchy. Mm-hmm . <affirmative> talking about, you know, needing food and shelter and clothing and then all the way up. And he said that stagnation actually kind of hits when we get to a certain point in our lives. Yeah . It sometimes too. And you really have to watch out for that. Right. But you don't become that stagnant person that we're saying we don't wanna be and that we are still thinking of others.

Speaker 1:

And a lot of that time that does that does happen is what we is what people may call their midlife crisis. Oh yeah . You know, in their forties and fifties and it happens. So how are you going to get through and how are you not going to be doing the same old, same old? And how are you going to be contributing to society and not get caught up in your own things in your own life? Because really getting caught up in your own things, you can't take that with you True . When you die <laugh> . That's true. So what are you doing to contribute and to share and to help.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. That's a, that's a question to really reflect on. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

So routine. You wanna ,

Speaker 2:

Next one , number three is routine. And we're looking at Steve Alexander Jr's work on this article where he talks about a routine as actually fostering creativity. And you and I have talked , we've taken personality personalities to us . So we do , cuz we've taken personality tests and we are not routine, nor

Speaker 1:

There's nothing routine

Speaker 2:

About us, about us.

Speaker 1:

Only thing routine is like if we have to be like, your job and my job Right. Is keeping us in a routine. Right. But if we had our own druthers, we would just be wisping in the wind.

Speaker 2:

Well, but it , but

Speaker 1:

Getting things

Speaker 2:

Done, right. Well, yeah. We

Speaker 1:

Get things done. We

Speaker 2:

Get things done. Yeah . Right . Yeah . I mean , you look at what , what we do or what we've done. Right . Right . But I mean, it's interesting because those routines, like right now, we've had to plan this time mm-hmm. <affirmative> today after our jobs, after our task, whatever we were doing mm-hmm . <affirmative> to get this production done. Right. Where if we didn't have some routine driving the earlier part of our day, <laugh> , would we be doing this right now?

Speaker 1:

Exactly . Well, exactly.

Speaker 2:

We have put it off to another time,

Speaker 1:

<laugh> . Right. But we have made our,

Speaker 2:

We committed to this. Right,

Speaker 1:

Right . Right. We made ourselves commit to this.

Speaker 2:

So I think I kind of buy into what he's saying even though we , like you said , we kinda laughed at first, but Right . I think we can say this has some truth to it.

Speaker 1:

And I also think, remember everything's in moderation, right? Mm-hmm. <affirmative>, if you have a routine that you can't deviate from, then that becomes problematic.

Speaker 2:

Well, it can be, or monotony can set in. Right. But what we kind of defined it as the other day, I was just looking in our notes from our conversation, is we talked about having some type of structure mm-hmm.

Speaker 1:

<affirmative> exactly. In your life. Exactly . And two recent studies tie both primary routines, hygiene, sleep and eating and secondary routines, social activities, and work to better mental health. And studies of both athletes and non-athletes have found that routines benefit performance by reducing overthinking, which tends to foster stress and pressure,

Speaker 2:

Which we talk about overthinking things out <laugh> all

Speaker 1:

The time. Right . But the thing is that if you are not releasing that stress hormone, and if you're not releasing all of that negative energy mm-hmm . <affirmative> , what are you doing? It's manifesting itself inside of you. Right. And you're just rethinking it over and over and over and over again. Where if you go for a walk or you go for a run, or if you just go for, you know, a walk in the woods or something, you

Speaker 2:

Know , you know, it's a really good way to release that stress. A

Speaker 1:

Punching bag ,

Speaker 2:

A workout with me anyway. Yeah. Yeah . We need to do that right after this today. Mm-hmm. <affirmative> four , Oh wait, this is a segue right into number four, which is persuasion. Would you like to run with that one ?

Speaker 1:

I suppose, I guess I will know Vanessa Bone's PhD says, we assume we don't have much influence over others. Hmm . Even those closest to us, but studies show we are more powerful than we think. And I thought this was really interesting of what she said, that, you know, you wanna convince, if you want to convince another person to do something, the first thing is to consider how likely they are to agree. And this really shocked me. Strangers are almost equally willing to pitch in, like they're almost as equally ready to say yes than close family and friends. Um, I thought that was really interesting.

Speaker 2:

Yeah . Well, and , and in my mind when we were talking about this the other day is there's a, there's a nuance between persuasion and control or manipulation in my mind. Mm-hmm.

Speaker 1:

<affirmative>. Well, persuasion isn't persuasion a little bit of manipulation. You're manipulating someone to agree with you. Right? True. Yeah . So, but it can be used for good or evil. <laugh> , right ? <laugh> , right?

Speaker 2:

Yes. So really a joker on the ridler or you Batman . Exactly. Or you loving .

Speaker 1:

Exactly. So, you know , but this, all, this, this whole thing of persuasion really suggests that we do have more influence over a lot of different types of people. And you know, when you have something to ask or when you have something to say, the people who are seeking that will want to listen to that.

Speaker 2:

That's a good point. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

You know, so that's just something to think about , uh, satisfaction.

Speaker 2:

All right . So single

Speaker 1:

Jenny , do you know

Speaker 2:

What

Speaker 1:

People who are never, ever satisfied?

Speaker 2:

Yes.

Speaker 1:

Oh wow. That was perfect . <laugh> . Okay . So you wanna go ahead and read the first part of that satisfaction.

Speaker 2:

Think of number five, satisfaction, the ability to be happy with who you are, where you are and what you have is a power that those who are never satisfied may want to emulate.

Speaker 1:

Who, where, and what.

Speaker 2:

Yep .

Speaker 1:

That is so true. And you know, it's funny because people who are , um, you know, I mean , what , what is success? What's a narrative of , of success? Well, those who make a lot of money, those who have a great job, those who have the best car, those who have a huge house. Oh , oh ,

Speaker 2:

Mr. Carter .

Speaker 1:

Yes. Go ahead.

Speaker 2:

What about being happy or having joy?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, Right. <laugh> . Exactly.

Speaker 2:

You know, happiness is an insight job, really. Right ? It's not exactly, not the material stuff.

Speaker 1:

No. I mean it's, it's a , it's an inner directed, you know, contentment.

Speaker 2:

It's a much more eloquent way to say what I just said.

Speaker 1:

<laugh> . Well , thank you. Can thank Lauren Samuel, a PhD for that <laugh> . But the thing is, is that, you know, outer, outer directed measures of success, They just, who cares?

Speaker 2:

Well, and it gets into not comparing ourselves right . To others, which is kind of a , a , a not to bring up fitness. Again, a gem kind of mantra is to not compare yourself to the person next to you. Right . But to compare yourself to who you were yesterday. And are you better today than you were yesterday? And not just from physiological standpoint, but I mean Right . Mentally, emotionally, intellectually. Are you better than you were yesterday and let's just keep moving ahead and that level of satisfaction.

Speaker 1:

I loved what you said in the beginning, nobody knows yourself better than you.

Speaker 2:

Right.

Speaker 1:

You know . Right. And I always tell my students, when you are standing up here speaking, no one knows more about the subject than you.

Speaker 2:

That's what I've already, that's what I've always told 'em too . If they're teaching a case or they're doing talking about their project, I said, You know more about the company that you researched than even I do. Right . As the teacher. Because you poured yourself into this project. That's right. That's right. And so that gives them confidence.

Speaker 1:

Exactly.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Cuz I know more about

Speaker 1:

It. Okay. Nostalgia. Letting our minds wander to the pa wander. Oh, letting our minds wander. That's nothing we do

Speaker 2:

For Wait ,

Speaker 1:

It's a bunny. Yeah, I know. Yeah. You're looking out the backyard and

Speaker 2:

There was a bunny. I

Speaker 1:

Know. Letting our minds wander to the past. Oh, to the past. Oh . Can be guilt inducing, but it shouldn't be fond, nostalgic memories can boost our mood and make us feel whole. And this is Matt Johnson PhD .

Speaker 2:

Right. Well, moving, moving on, learning from the past Yeah. Looking to the future. Exactly. And not playing the old tapes. You know what, if you go back and you're thinking about a time of, you know, Yes . Or year in certain events or experience, whatever mm-hmm . <affirmative> and then that hard part or that not so happy part comes to mind. And then you're playing what we call playing those tapes for those who know what tapes are.

Speaker 1:

Right. Exactly.

Speaker 2:

Playing that download, if you will. Exactly. Not letting that hurt those memories, you know? Right. And remembering the good.

Speaker 1:

Exactly. So Matt Johnson says, Who we were in the past isn't who we are now. We may think feeler act differently today. And as ts Elliott says, you are not the same people who left that station or who will arrive at any terminus. You know, you're like a quilt. Your memory stitches together, all of these different,

Speaker 2:

Ooh , I like that.

Speaker 1:

Paths that have happened in your life.

Speaker 2:

My grandmother used to make quilts. My mother would see the quilts when we would go visit, and it would be, you know, a a square sort of squares from, or dress from when she was little or something that she would remember, you know, a tablecloth that my grandmother used to use on Easter or whatever. I mean, it would , and it , these quilts had memories. Good memories. Yeah. Yeah. Right.

Speaker 1:

That's

Speaker 2:

Cool. Okay, so number seven, which we don't really agree with,

Speaker 1:

Right.

Speaker 2:

It's desire. David led did a great job explaining , um, what's meant by this hidden superpower. But do you wanna run with this one?

Speaker 1:

Yeah. So few feelings are more guilt inducing than, or as resistible, as a crush on someone who's not your partner. But in fact, research shows that outside crushes, as long as they're not acted on, generally have a positive effect on people's primary relationship. And basically, why do adults have crushes? The researchers who led a recent study suggest two possibilities. First, the feeling of attraction may be hardwired into our sexual identity. Mm . I mean, yeah. I mean, that's how we met our partners. That's how we meet people. We're attracted to them. Even if it's like a best friend, you're attracted to them because their personality, you're attracted to them for what they have to offer. Right? Mm-hmm. <affirmative>. And, but sometimes we are attracted to people we know we'll never have a relationship with. So it's a , so he's really talking about not just any attraction, but a sexual attraction. And those who don't act on it are secure in their relationships because they're like, You know what? We're not going to act on this. We are going to , um, just be attracted to them. Well, you could

Speaker 2:

Be, People are attracted to like movie stars and TV stars all the time.

Speaker 1:

I think what he's saying is that it could be healthy.

Speaker 2:

Okay.

Speaker 1:

You know, it could be healthy, but I don't know. It's just, it just seems to be a slippery

Speaker 2:

Slope. Yeah. It is. Like

Speaker 1:

If you know, you know, Yeah . Slippery slope. Okay . What's eight

Speaker 2:

Hope?

Speaker 1:

I like this one

Speaker 2:

Do too . You wanna start with it?

Speaker 1:

Yeah. The power to access the belief that things can get better, no matter the challenge can quite literally change the world.

Speaker 2:

It can. And Albert Einstein talked about it in a similar way when he talked about imagination. He said, imagination is everything. It's the preview to life's coming attractions. And you think about having hope and having faith and having things that are not seen, but are coming to be. For me personally, the doctors after my car wreck said that I would never walk again. Mm-hmm . <affirmative> . But did I give up hope? No. So in that frame of mind, just having, having hope Yeah . You know, that , that something is coming into your future that will be, I don't wanna call it an expectation, but something that you're desiring going back to number seven. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Right. In a way, what do you think?

Speaker 1:

We get married, <laugh>.

Speaker 2:

We were all hoping

Speaker 1:

That . We were all hoping, and then it turned into a miracle. <laugh>

Speaker 2:

Miracles do happen .

Speaker 1:

Miracles do have it . It's right here. It happened, it happened to me. Yeah . You know, when you think that you believe that it's hopeless, you know, and you have no power or no reason to live, or no reason to act, and like you can't win or whatever hope is, is a feeling of , um, you know, of power really.

Speaker 2:

Well we're talking about hidden superpowers. So Yeah. And there , I mean, I , uh, there's songs I've listened to Danny Goki and a couple others. You know , I guess Mercy Me sings a a song about somebody who keeps hoping even when the situation seems hopeless. And we all know people like that. I mean, some people say that about me. I'm all like miss optimism all , not all the time, but a lot of the time <laugh> . Right. So . Right . Yeah . I mean , kinda depends on what's going on at the time, but mm-hmm . <affirmative> , you know, having, how do you, how do you like define, truly define hope?

Speaker 1:

David Feldman points out in his article that people may hear or have heard the expression, Hope is not a strategy. And he says, Don't believe it. Hope he says is a way of thinking that pushes us into action. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>. And I think of you and your story when you were in your accident and your arms were severely damaged mm-hmm . <affirmative> , and you had that hope of holding your babies again. Right. And your arms. Right. And how are you going to do that if you weren't able to use your arms? And so you did, you did what it took to get better so that you could be with your children Right. And the way you wanted to be.

Speaker 2:

Well, and that's where Yeah, exactly. And you could be right, but you had to not give up. Right. Right. And that's where some people coming in the picture in your life and your environment, in your atmosphere tell you to not follow your dreams or to give up on something. And you just gotta turn your mind toward hope and perseverance and realize that you , if you're really feeling called to go for something, to go for it.

Speaker 1:

And who knows you better than

Speaker 2:

You. You. That's

Speaker 1:

Right . Okay. Daydreaming Number nine.

Speaker 2:

<laugh> . Oh ,

Speaker 1:

Look at the pretty cloud .

Speaker 2:

Wait . Yeah. Another bunny.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. There you go. Case in point. People Case in point .

Speaker 2:

Well, daydreaming. I mean,

Speaker 1:

Daydreaming can be helpful, it can be good. Right? Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Far

Speaker 1:

From a form of procrastination and indulgence in fantasy, or a sign of an idle mind daydreaming has been shown to deliver real world benefits by Brendan Kelly , md, PhD . Do you wanna talk a little bit about that?

Speaker 2:

I mean, you can get into dreaming, having dreams and imagination, which is key. Mm-hmm . <affirmative> , I mean, it's key to have dreams.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. They help us to think, you know Right . Creatively

Speaker 2:

When you're working on something and suddenly you're daydreaming. But that can have a positive impact. Right.

Speaker 1:

Ex it can have a

Speaker 2:

Positive impact, mean it be a little respite from what you're working on. And sometimes you'll come out of it totally clear and ready to pursue whatever you're working on. Or an idea for solving a problem like you came up with.

Speaker 1:

Exactly. And the, you know, the problem solving and the ability to reach conclusions and everything. I mean, there have been brain scans and studies that have shown this actually happening. So we're not just making this up. And, you know, it had previously been thought that the only part of the brain active during daydreams was the default network, which is associated with low level routine mental activity. However, though this research shows that executive network concerned with complex high level problem solving is also activated when we daydream. So it's high functioning or low functioning, whatever it is, whatever you need it to be, it's there for you to use in a positive way,

Speaker 2:

In a strategic frame of mind. We could schedule daydreaming into our daily schedule.

Speaker 1:

I, Yes.

Speaker 2:

I mean, I hear like making a , sitting

Speaker 1:

On my bouncy ball. Right,

Speaker 2:

Exactly. Doing out crunches. Yeah. Rush towards I didn't say that. Um , <laugh>

Speaker 1:

A bouncy ball.

Speaker 2:

So, Well, I mean, there's always that, and you and I have talked about this. Make an appointment with yourself every day on your calendar so that you have some time yourself to plan and, and to figure out life and all that. And maybe this is part of that. Well,

Speaker 1:

He says that at the , at the very end, we could even benefit from consciously carving out some time. Yeah . Right. And space to allow our mind to wander and see where it takes us.

Speaker 2:

Wow.

Speaker 1:

I think I'm gonna do that right

Speaker 2:

Now. Yeah , I was thinking the same thing.

Speaker 1:

Why don't you go ahead and do number 10. Well , you my daydream. Okay now . Okay, go ahead. Restlessness. Go

Speaker 2:

Rest . Restlessness. Okay , so JTA Jordan is talking about restlessness. So when boredom sets in, staying in one place can be hard on our mental health. Those with an urge to get out and enjoy new and different experiences may have a distinct advantage. Mm-hmm . <affirmative> . So restlessness is a hidden superpower . I think I do agree with that because we , you and I talked about this, we , we can get into boredom or monotony at times. Yeah . When things are too structured, it has number whatever.

Speaker 1:

So , or when things are too stressed out, when we're so stressed out, we just shut down.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah . And, you know, and experiencing diversity and going to new or different places and engaging in different experiences can improve wellbeing. And that's what Juta German says. So, you know, positive emotions were higher on days when people were different places. They , she uses the word geolocations. Yeah. And so when they were doing things and out there and getting out there, then their emotions of positive emotions were higher and their experiential diversity was happening. You know, all these new experiences. And we know that though. We know that if you stay in the house and you stay in front of the TV with a bag of Cheetos and a six pack of diet Pepsi. Right. That's no bueno . That's no good.

Speaker 2:

Right. Well, do you think the, the pandemic led to some of this?

Speaker 1:

Yeah , absolutely. Absolutely. It really limited our ability to go out there and do things. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>, right? Mm-hmm. <affirmative>. So yeah. It's almost like we're reteaching or relearning, reteaching ourselves and relearning how to get out there and how to do things. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Post pandemic. Well , we're still kind of in the pandemic, but

Speaker 1:

Yeah. But, you know. Yeah. But yeah, I thought this was kind of interesting to talk about and to find, you know Yeah . Our , um, you know , hidden superpowers. Yeah. That was really cool.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Really

Speaker 1:

Cool. Top 10 hidden superpowers can be very powerful for body, mind, and image.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. No doubt.

Speaker 1:

And so we challenge you to find your hidden superpower, because we all have one.

Speaker 2:

Right.

Speaker 1:

Some of us may have to dig a little deeper than others <laugh> , but

Speaker 2:

She's looking at me as she says that, but that's okay. No,

Speaker 1:

No, no. What was the one that we just did? Uh , daydreaming. I already know what yours is, <laugh> . No , no , no. It's good. It's good. You're not , uh, you're not always in the clouds. You're pretty pretty there most of the time. That's

Speaker 2:

The time . Well, yeah, we talked about

Speaker 1:

And me too. I can throw myself in there. You know, I mean , I think, I think if you're creative, you're going to have many of these hidden superpowers.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

And if you're not the creative type, then perhaps it's time to tap into maybe one just to dip your toe into the water, you

Speaker 2:

Know? Yeah. And the , the one, like the routine one, though, that's an interesting one. For somebody who doesn't see themselves as flexible or whatever, what if you examine your routines, your structure in your day mm-hmm . <affirmative> , and figure out what it leads to. Does it ever lead to a certain level of creativity or more productivity in certain times of your day that you could really investigate that and then kind of see, well, what are some other superpowers

Speaker 1:

That's Yeah . And then the other , it's all about balance, right? Right . I mean, we should all have a little bit of these.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah. Right.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I mean, nothing is, you know, nothing is totally,

Speaker 2:

Nothing's outta totally outta reach.

Speaker 1:

No, Nothing is totally outta reach <laugh> . Nope , nothing.

Speaker 2:

In our next episode of BMI redefined, we will be discussing

Speaker 1:

The power of positive thinking.

Speaker 2:

All right . Alrighty .

Speaker 1:

And how that really contributes to your body, your mind, and your image.

Speaker 3:

Everybody, thank you so much for joining us. You,

Speaker 2:

This has been fun.

Speaker 3:

It has been fun. Do you wanna close us out?

Speaker 2:

Yes. Uh , we just thank you for joining us today for BMI Redefined with a Gen end

Speaker 3:

Mo.

Speaker 2:

Yes. You guys have a great, awesome day, awesome week, and we will see you and hear from you next time. Yay.

Speaker 3:

Bye guys.

Speaker 2:

Bye.

Speaker 1:

If you have enjoyed us and you would like to hear more, please contact us at bmi redefined@gmail.com to schedule a consultation or to make an appointment for us to present at your next company meeting.

Speaker 2:

We lead workshops, lunch and learn seminars, and we are available as keynote speakers. We tailor our presentation to fit your exact needs.